Orkoro Attributes MVP Award To Hard Work

Orkoro Attributes MVP Award To Hard Work

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Source: www.thetidenewsonline.com

Author: Published 4 hours agoon November 18, 2020By The Tide


Your independence does not mean your work can’t be criticized – NPP to Amidu

Your independence does not mean your work can’t be criticized – NPP to Amidu

The governing New Patriotic Party (NPP) has said the government never interfered in the work of the Special Prosecutor, Martin Amidu.

Director of Communications of the NPP, Yaw Buabeng Asamoa said Mr. Amidu’s work was subjected to criticisms and that cannot be deemed as interference.

Mr. Amidu cited a number of reasons for his resignation. He said in his letter to the president that “It is essential for me to state for the purpose of the records, and contrary to public perceptions, that my appointment letter was received on 5th February 2020 (almost two (2)-years after my appointment).

“The copy addressees made no efforts to honour any of the conditions of appointment in terms of emoluments and benefits of the appointment ever since my warrant of appointment was issued on 23rd February 2018 to the date of my letter of resignation. The Deputy Special Prosecutor has also not been paid any emoluments since her appointment, and there is the need to redress that situation for her now that I am out of the way.

“The events of 12th November 2020 removed the only protection I had from the threats and plans directed at me for undertaking the Agyapa Royalties Limited Transactions anti-corruption assessment report and dictates that I resign as the Special Prosecutor immediately.

“I should not ordinarily be announcing my resignation to the public myself but the traumatic experience I went through from 20th October 2020 to 2nd November 2020 when I conveyed in a thirteen (13) page letter the conclusions and observations on the analysis of the risk of corruption and anti-corruption assessment on the Report On Agyapa Royalties Limited Transactions and Other Matters Related Thereto to the President as Chairman of the National Security Council cautions against not bringing my resignation as the Special Prosecutor with immediate to the notice of the Ghanaian public and the world.

“The reaction I received for daring to produce the Agyapa Royalties Limited Transactions anti-corruption report convinces me beyond any reasonable doubt that I was not intended to exercise any independence as the Special Prosecutor in the prevention, investigation, prosecution, and recovery of assets of corruption. My position as the Special Prosecutor has consequently become clearly untenable.”

But the statement by the NPP said “Mr. Amidu has not resigned because any investigation of his has been interfered with by the Presidency or any member of the government. Since 2018, he has been offered all the room and support he needed by law and mandate and every money he has requested to set up an entirely new institution, which comes with its own challenges, and to operate the Office independently and efficiently. No political office holder has interfered in the administration of that Office.

“Indeed, that his actions appear to impact both the incumbent and immediate past governments vindicates the wisdom of the mandate and powers of the Office which he occupied. An Office hinged on independence of thought and action.

“Independence cannot be infallible. Independence does not mean the actions of the Office cannot be commented upon by the people as has happened with Mr. Amidu’s report on Agyapa.

“Also, for the OSP to work well, the principles of natural justice must be respected at all times. Mr. Amidu’s letter of resignation, it would appear that he chose to resign because H.E the President sought to apply “Audi Alteram Partem” rules to enable the Hon. Finance Minister state his case after an anti-corruption risk and corruption risk assessment report was done on Agyapa and the Minister’s role in it assessed and conclusions reached without giving the Minister the prior opportunity to explain matters beyond the documents assessed.”

Source: myashhfmonline.com

Author: Umar Kamil


Tennessee Williams - Wikipedia

Tennessee Williams – Wikipedia

Tennessee Williams

Williams photographed by Orland Fernandez in 1965 for the 20th anniversary of The Glass Menagerie.

Thomas Lanier Williams III

Columbus, Mississippi, U.S.

New York, New York, U.S.

Tennessee Williams (age 5) in Clarksdale, MS.

Tennessee Williams (age 5) in Clarksdale, MS.

Tom would go to his room with black coffee and cigarettes and I would hear the typewriter clicking away at night in the silent house. Some mornings when I walked in to wake him for work, I would find him sprawled fully dressed across the bed, too tired to remove his clothes.[16]

235 E 58th Street, New York, New York

Tennessee Williams House, Key West, Florida

“I, Thomas Lanier (Tennessee) Williams, being in sound mind upon this subject, and having declared this wish repeatedly to my close friends-do hereby state my desire to be buried at sea. More specifically, I wish to be buried at sea at as close a possible point as the American poet Hart Crane died by choice in the sea; this would be ascrnatible [sic], this geographic point, by the various books (biographical) upon his life and death. I wish to be sewn up in a canvas sack and dropped overboard, as stated above, as close as possible to where Hart Crane was given by himself to the great mother of life which is the sea: the Caribbean, specifically, if that fits the geography of his death. Otherwise—whereever fits it [sic].”

Williams’ grave, Calvary Cemetery, St. Louis, Missouri

  • Candles to the Sun (1936)
  • Fugitive Kind (1937)
  • Spring Storm (1937)
  • Me Vashya (1937)
  • Not About Nightingales (1938)
  • Battle of Angels (1940)
  • I Rise in Flame, Cried the Phoenix (1941)
  • You Touched Me (1945)
  • Stairs to the Roof (1947)
  • The Glass Menagerie (1944)
  • A Streetcar Named Desire (1947)
  • Summer and Smoke (1948)
  • The Rose Tattoo (1951)
  • Camino Real (1953)
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1955)
  • Orpheus Descending (1957)
  • Suddenly Last Summer (1958)
  • Sweet Bird of Youth (1959)
  • Period of Adjustment (1960)
  • The Night of the Iguana (1961)
  • The Eccentricities of a Nightingale (1962, rewriting of Summer and Smoke)
  • The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore (1963)
  • The Mutilated (1965)
  • The Seven Descents of Myrtle (1968, aka Kingdom of Earth)
  • In the Bar of a Tokyo Hotel (1969)
  • Will Mr. Merriweather Return from Memphis? (1969)
  • Small Craft Warnings (1972)
  • The Two-Character Play (1973)
  • Out Cry (1973, rewriting of The Two-Character Play)
  • The Red Devil Battery Sign (1975)
  • This Is (An Entertainment) (1976)
  • Vieux Carré (1977)
  • A Lovely Sunday for Creve Coeur (1979)
  • Clothes for a Summer Hotel (1980)
  • The Notebook of Trigorin (1980)
  • Something Cloudy, Something Clear (1981)
  • A House Not Meant to Stand (1982)
  • In Masks Outrageous and Austere (1983)
  • The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone (1950, adapted into a film in 1961, and again in 2003)
  • Moise and the World of Reason (1975)
  • The Glass Menagerie (1950)
  • A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
  • The Rose Tattoo (1955)
  • Baby Doll (1956)
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)
  • Suddenly, Last Summer (1959)
  • The Fugitive Kind (1959)
  • Ten Blocks on the Camino Real (1966)
  • Boom! (1968)
  • Stopped Rocking and Other Screenplays (1984)
  • The Loss of a Teardrop Diamond (2009; screenplay from 1957)
  • The Vengeance of Nitocris (1928)
  • The Field of Blue Children (1939)
  • Oriflamme (1944)
  • The Resemblance Between a Violin Case and a Coffin (1951)
  • Hard Candy: A Book of Stories (1954)
  • Three Players of a Summer Game and Other Stories (1960)
  • The Knightly Quest: a Novella and Four Short Stories (1966)
  • “One Arm”
  • “The Malediction”
  • “The Poet”
  • “Chronicle of a Demise”
  • “Desire and the Black Masseur”
  • “Portrait of a Girl in Glass”
  • “The Important Thing”
  • “The Angel in the Alcove”
  • “The Field of Blue Children”
  • “The Night of the Iguana”
  • “The Yellow Bird”
  • Eight Mortal Ladies Possessed: a Book of Stories (1974)
  • Tent Worms (1980)
  • It Happened the Day the Sun Rose, and Other Stories (1981), published by Sylvester & Orphanos
  • Collected Stories (1985) (New Directions)
  • American Blues (1948)
  • Mister Paradise and Other One-Act Plays (2005)
  • Dragon Country: a book of one-act plays (1970)
  • The Traveling Companion and Other Plays (2008)
  • At Liberty (1939)
  • The Magic Tower (1936)
  • Me, Vashya (1937)
  • Curtains for the Gentleman (1936)
  • In Our Profession (1938)
  • Every Twenty Minutes (1938)
  • Honor the Living (1937)
  • The Case of the Crushed Petunias (1941)
  • Moony’s Kid Don’t Cry (1936)
  • The Dark Room (1939)
  • The Pretty Trap (1944)
  • Interior: Panic (1946)
  • Kingdom of Earth (1967)
  • I Never Get Dressed Till After Dark on Sundays (1973)
  • Some Problems for the Moose Lodge (1980)
  • «Something wild…» (introduction) (1953)
  • 27 Wagons Full of Cotton (1946 and 1953)
  • The Purification (1946 and 1953)
  • The Lady of Larkspur Lotion (1946 and 1953)
  • The Last of My Solid Gold Watches (1946 and 1953)
  • Portrait of a Madonna (1946 and 1953)
  • Auto-da-Fé (1946 and 1953)
  • Lord Byron’s Love Letter (1946 and 1953)
  • The Strangest Kind of Romance (1946 and 1953)
  • The Long Goodbye (1946 and 1953)
  • At Liberty (1946)
  • Moony’s Kid Don’t Cry (1946)
  • Hello from Bertha (1946 and 1953)
  • This Property Is Condemned (1946 and 1953)
  • Talk to Me Like the Rain and Let Me Listen… (1953)
  • Something Unspoken (1953)
  • A Recluse and His Guest (1982)
  • Now the Cats with Jeweled Claws (1981)
  • Steps Must Be Gentle (1980)
  • Ivan’s Widow (1982)
  • This Is the Peaceable Kingdom (1981)
  • Aimez-vous Ionesco? (c.1975)
  • The Demolition Downtown (1971)
  • Lifeboat Drill (1979)
  • Once in a Lifetime (1939)
  • The Strange Play (1939)
  • The Theatre of Tennessee Williams, Volume VI
  • The Theatre of Tennessee Williams, Volume VII
  • In the Winter of Cities (1956)
  • Androgyne, Mon Amour (1977)
  • The Collected Poems of Tennessee Williams (2002)
  • Memoirs (1975)
  • New Selected Essays: Where I Live (2009)
  • Spring Storm
  • Not About Nightingales
  • Battle of Angels
  • I Rise in Flame, Cried the Phoenix
  • 27 Wagons Full of Cotton
  • The Lady of Larkspur Lotion
  • The Last of My Solid Gold Watches
  • Portrait of a Madonna
  • Auto-da-Fé
  • Lord Byron’s Love Letter
  • This Property Is Condemned
  • The Glass Menagerie
  • A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Summer and Smoke
  • The Rose Tattoo
  • Camino Real
  • “Something Wild”
  • Talk to Me Like the Rain and Let Me Listen
  • Something Unspoken
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof
  • Orpheus Descending
  • Suddenly, Last Summer
  • Sweet Bird of Youth
  • Period of Adjustment
  • The Night of the Iguana
  • The Eccentricities of a Nightingale
  • The Milk Train Doesn’t Stop Here Anymore
  • The Mutilated
  • Kingdom of Earth (The Seven Descents of Myrtle)
  • Small Craft Warnings
  • Out Cry
  • Vieux Carré
  • A Lovely Sunday for Creve Coeur
  • “Crazy Night”[59]
  • Lanier family tree
  • Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival
  • Virginia Spencer Carr, friend and biographer of Williams
  • Audrey Wood
  • Gross, Robert F., ed. Tennessee Williams: A Casebook. Routledge (2002). Print. ISBN 0-8153-3174-6.
  • Jacobus, Lee. The Bedford Introduction to Drama. Bedford: Boston. Print. 2009.
  • Lahr, John. Tennessee Williams: Mad Pilgrimage of the Flesh. W. W. Norton & Co. New York. Print. 2014. ISBN 978-0-393-02124-0.
  • Leverich, Lyle. Tom: The Unknown Tennessee Williams. W. W. Norton & Company. Reprint. 1997. ISBN 0-393-31663-7.
  • Saddik, Annette. The Politics of Reputation: The Critical Reception of Tennessee Williams’ Later Plays. Associated University Presses. London. 1999.
  • Spoto, Donald. The Kindness of Strangers: The Life of Tennessee Williams. Da Capo Press. Reprint. 1997. ISBN 0-306-80805-6.
  • Williams, Tennessee. Memoirs. Doubleday. Print. 1975. ISBN 0-385-00573-3.
  • Williams, Dakin. His Brother’s Keeper: The Life and Murder of Tennessee Williams. Dakin’s Corner Press. First Edition. Print. 1983.
  • Tennessee Williams Collection and Research Guide at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin
  • Tennessee Williams Papers at Columbia University. Rare Book and Manuscript Library
  • Tennessee Williams manuscripts, 1972–1974, held by the Billy Rose Theatre Division, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
  • Williams, Tennessee at Curlie
  • The Paris Review interview
  • Tennessee Williams on IMDb
  • Tennessee Williams at the Internet Off-Broadway Database
  • Source: en.wikipedia.org

    Author: Pulitzer Prize for Drama: Authors


    Orkoro Attributes MVP Award To Hard Work


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